2D Shapes Quadrilaterals (FREE Google Classroom Template Download!)

Here is a FREE download for a project for students to collaborate using Google Classroom, Google Slides, and Google Drawings.

Topic: Understanding Two-Dimensional Shape Properties: Quadrilaterals

Standard: 5.G.3b

Student Slide Example:

 

Self-Paced Directions and Resources Provided:

 

Steps:

  1.  Copy this link— 2D Shapes- Quadrilaterals
  2. Then you MUST go to “File” and  “Make A Copy”.

 

Now it’s yours to use and make any changes. 

 

 

A Clever Way To Understand AREA

The idea behind AREA is a basic concept that most students, and even adults, don’t understand.  Most people know to label area with square units such as 30 square feet.  But WHY?

The area of a shape or room is simply describing how many actual squares (measured by feet, meters, or another unit) that fit inside the shape.  Most students learn that area is what’s “inside the shape” but they don’t connect it with the physical squares it takes to fill it up.

For example, if a living room measures 10ft by 12ft, the area is 120 sq ft. That means 120 squares that are a foot by a foot would fit inside like a PUZZLE. 

Here is a great way to start piecing together a PUZZLE that demonstrates the foundation of AREA!

These foam pieces connect to make a rectangle measuring 2 pieces by 3 pieces.  It’s area is 6 sq. pieces. Meaning, to fill the shape it would take 6 squares, which can be easily observed.

img_9610

 

Here is another example using foam mats. This rectangle is measuring 3 pieces by 4 pieces giving it’s area 12 sq. pieces.  Have your child count the actual squares connected, which should come to 12!

Look for other examples of area using squares!

© MathMom.org

Shapes! Call Them By Their Names

Just before my son’s 2nd Birthday we were at the park.  He pointed to these canopies and said, “Look! Pyramids.”  I was a proud math mama!

Park

Start now and have your child learn and say the CORRECT names of 2D and 3D shapes.  Call them by what they actually are.  Kids can pick up on them just as easily.  Here are the most common shapes you’ll see with your kids and their toys.

square

triangleRectangle

Circle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These shapes can be found in your child’s toys, books, at the park, at a restaurant, and more.  Take the opportunity to teach them to your child the correct vocabulary.

Here is my son building his 3D shapes!

Gavin Shapes

 

© MathMom.org

 

Why I LOVE Area Models!

Area models come from the basic idea of solving for area.  They are a wonderful tool for younger students to do multi-digit multiplication problems (for example 14 x 17).  They develop student understanding of multiplication, place value, and the distributive property that is later used in Algebra.

I did not learn area models in school but I swear by them with my students and can’t wait for my children to do them!

Let’s review the basic idea of area.  If I want to put tile down in my bathroom and it measures 5ft by 6ft.  We multiply 5 x 6 and 30 total square feet.

Here is the model of this situation.  It shows 6 feet extended across and 5 feet extended down.  When they overlap they create 30 squares that are a foot by a foot.  This example is an area model.

Area 1Area-2Area-3Area-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is an examples of a double-digit multiplication problem solved with an area model.  This example can be done by students starting in 3rd grade.  I know it is not the fastest way but it teaches students understanding and skills they can use when problems get more difficult.  By 6th grade they will learn to do it the traditional method, which yes, is more efficient.

Let’s solve 14 x 17.

First, setup a square just like real life area problems.

Take each number, 14 and 17, and break them down by place value.  14 becomes 10 and 4 and 17 becomes 10 and 7. Area-11

Just like with the bathroom floor problem, we are going to extend each number and draw 4 boxes.  Inside each box will be the answer of the over lapping multiplication problem.

We first solve 10 x 7 and write 70.  Then multiply 10 by 10 to get 100.  (This idea represents an Algebra concept called distribution.  We have distributed the 10 to 7 and 10.)

Area-22

Next we are going to multiply 4 by 7 to get 28 and 4 by 10 to get 40.  Answers go in each box. Area-33

Lastly!  We add up all the answers we got from multiplying.  These answers are called products. Area-44

238 is the same answer we would get if we did it the traditional way.

Area-55

© MathMom.org

 

MATH Scavenger Hunt For Busy Kids

As a mom of a busy toddler, I’m always looking for ways to engage him.   My son loves to be challenged with scavenger hunts.  Of course, I put a math twist on it!

Simply have your child go find math related items in their room.  (This could be played at a restaurant or other location of the well.)  Here is a list of ideas for kids to find:

  1. Shapes
  2. A certain number of objects
  3. Objects with actual numbers on them

Here are some other ideas to add to your game!

  • Offer a reward such as a treat or 10 minutes of cartoons
  • Make it a relay game by timing your child or setting up a running obstacle course as they find each object
  • Make it a timed race against other kids
  • Make it more of “Hide and Seek” with objects

 

Here is a printable of different 2D and 3D shapes!  SHAPES PRINTABLE

Ready? Set? Go! 

 

© MathMom.org